Can An Addict Or Alcoholic Stop On Their Own?

By DFCAdmin in QA | | 15 Jun 2017
 

quitting-alcohol-drugs

 

Some call it an act of God, divine intervention, or a miracle. There’s a peculiar double edged sword about addiction and getting sober. At the height of someone’s active addiction, a strong marker that they have in fact developed a debilitating chemical dependency is that they cannot stop. No matter what methods they try, how many times they try them, inevitably, they pick up another drink or drug. The running philosophy is that addicts and alcoholics cannot stop on their own. Treatment, intervention, detox, therapy- all of these methods are designed to help the addict or alcoholic learn how to stop using drugs and alcohol. Ironically, by the time an addict or alcoholic gets to learning the practical tools and therapeutic techniques to stop using drugs and alcohol…they’ve already stopped. Therein lies the great paradox. Perhaps the power comes from somewhere or someone greater than themselves. It just might be an act of divinity. Yet, the moment an addict decides they want to get sober and commit themselves to doing so, they stop. When they arrive at detox, when they arrive at treatment- whatever their last moment is, the next one does not include picking up another drink or drug.

Of course, there are factors. Treatment has rules, regulations, structure, and procedures. Despite creating many rules for themselves many times they weren’t able to adhere to them. Yet one day they are capable. Each day after that, they continue to be capable. As time goes on, their strength in recovery grows. In truth, they do stop drinking and using on their own. Truth truly be told, they don’t do it on their own.

Community and support is what gave alcoholics who first started finding “the solution” to alcoholism hope. One man or woman after another was finding that magical place between hopeless drinking and hopeful sobriety. Alcoholics Anonymous, the world renowned 12 step program was thought up when one man, founder Bill Wilson, found reprieve from an unending urge to drink after many months of sobriety. Upon conversing with another struggling alcoholic, he found hope and knew that he didn’t have to struggle alone.

 

At Design For Change, we bring clients together to form a solid community of solidarity in recovery. Our residential programs and recovery services help clients create actionable changes in their lives for lifelong sobriety. For more information, call us today at (877) 267-3646.