Why Is Exercise Important For Recovering From Drug And Alcohol Addiction?

By DFCAdmin in QA | | 18 Jul 2017
 

exercise-recovery

 

Exercise produces endorphins which are hormones that affect the body’s opiate receptors. Though you may feel achy and sore after exercise, the activity actually produces analgesic effects in the brain which is where that exercise “high” can come from. In addition to creating happy hormone production, exercise has many benefits for recovery.

Exercise boosts confidence and self-esteem.

In those earliest days of recovery when you’re tired, achy, cranky, and low on energy, exercise might not be anything to feel good about. Other people seem light years ahead of you and they’ve been sober just a little bit longer. Your health is progressing over time. That’s what makes exercise a great addition to a recovery program. You gain confidence by watching your body heal, gain its strength back, and witness what you are capable of doing. Even if you’re huffing and puffing and taking breaks- you’re doing it. Doing exercise is better than doing drugs or drinking alcohol.

Exercise creates more energy and contributes to better sleep.

Just 20 minutes of low to moderately intense exercise three days a week can significantly change your energy, according to research. Getting your blood pumping is good for more than heart rate, it sends oxygen flowing to your muscles, restoring them and giving them an energy boost. Exercise is also proven to create better sleep. First of all, you’re tired after a good workout because you’ve actually used your body. We’re tired when we don’t work out because we aren’t using our body. As a result, we have pent up energy, no matter how lazy we feel, and our minds as well as our bodies get restless.

Exercise regulates stress and reduces symptoms of depression and anxiety.

When you exercise and put your body’s natural energy to work, you regulate more than the flow of blood and oxygen. You also help your body regulate stress hormones like adrenaline and cortisol. Reducing stress chemically helps you reduce stress hormonally as well as emotionally. Exercise has also been shown to reduce the severity of depression and anxiety. Both depression and anxiety are common to come and go in early recovery as the brain adjusts to normalized levels without the presence of drug and alcohol addiction.

 

Design For Change emphasizes wellness for mind and body by combining evidence based therapy treatments, holistic healing methods, and spiritual development tools for patients. Our programs help clients take the actionable changes they need in their lives to recover. We believe everyone is capable of recovering who is capable of change. For information on our treatment programs and recovery services, call us today at (877) 267-3646.