benzo withdrawal

Are There Symptoms of Withdrawal from Benzodiazepines?

By DFCAdmin in QA | | 8 Nov 2017
 

Benzodiazepines are a type of tranquilizer. Two of the most commonly prescribed ones are Valium and Xanax. They work on the central nervous system reducing anxiety and producing sedation and muscle relaxation. They are addictive, especially when taken for their sedating properties.

Doctors do prescribe benzodiazepines for medically valid reasons. Some of these include anxiety, alcohol withdrawal, seizure control, muscle relaxation, insomnia, and given prior to surgery. The problems with abuse occur when the medication is taken differently than prescribed or when taken without a prescription.

There are some clear signs and symptoms when someone is abusing benzos. They may include: drowsiness, unsteadiness while walking or moving, irritability, impaired judgement, poor coordination, blurred vision, hospitality, or reduced inhibition. If they have crossed the line into addiction the symptoms become more extreme.

Indicators someone is addicted to benzodiazepines may include them appearing to be detached from life and sedated. They may show indicators that they no longer care about things that used to be very important to them. They often stop setting goals and lose interest in life. They withdraw from friends and family.

If you have developed an addiction to Benzodiazepines you will experience withdrawal symptoms when you stop taking the drug. Symptoms of withdrawal from benzodiazepines are:

  • Sleep disturbance
  • Panic attack
  • Depression
  • Irritability
  • Increased tension and anxiety
  • Sweating
  • Hand tremor
  • Difficulty in concentration
  • Nausea
  • Weight loss
  • Palpitations
  • Muscular pain
  • Headaches
  • Stiffness

More extreme withdrawal symptoms may include seizures and psychotic reactions.

Withdrawal from benzodiazepines is known for being challenging. It is highly recommended that you seek a slow detox approach that is guided my medical professionals. Benzodiazepine withdrawal takes more than few days. Sometimes it takes months or even longer to fully be free from withdrawal symptoms.

A slow detox approach means a doctor prescribes a lower dose or less potent benzodiazepine for you. Your body slowly adjusts to the changes helping evade some of the withdrawal symptoms. The slow change over time also allows time to adjust to new ways of adjusting to stressors that may have triggered a desire to use.

Recovery is possible. With the help of a trained medical team, you can detox slowly. With the help of a counselor, you can learn to handle situations that used to drive you reach for the drugs. You will begin to discover new tools for handling life’s ups and downs without benzodiazepines.

 

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