What Is Yoga Going To Be Like In Treatment?

By DFCAdmin in QA | | 29 Aug 2017
 

 

treatment-yoga

 

If you’re going to residential treatment for a drug and/or alcohol addiction- good for you. You’re in for a radical experience of deep and transformational healing. After your treatment program completes, you are going to emerge a new person with a whole new set of skills, practices, as well as a brain full of new knowledge. One of the things you are going to walk away with is more information about and experience with yoga.

Yoga is popular. The westernized trend of yoga has hit a full peak and science has taken notice. Typically conservative science and holistic science do not see eye to eye. However, yoga is an exception. Hundreds of research studies have been conducted on yoga, people practicing yoga, and the many benefits. Numerous studies have found that yoga detoxifies the body, reduces symptoms of depression and stress, strengthens the heart, improves wellbeing physically as well as mentally, and finally, yoga might actually make you a nice, more compassionate person.

If you are feeling standoffish to yoga, you aren’t the only one. Yoga is indeed a bit weird your first few times! Yoga is nothing like traditional exercise classes. Ambient music, low lights, a soft tone from a teacher, words about mindfulness, non-judgment, breathing, meeting yourself where you’re at- yoga is a far cry from rigorous exercise classes. Everyone is in either really tight or really loose clothing and making strange sounds with their breath. At the end of the class, there is a haze over everyone’s eyes as they say “namaste” and leave in peace.

Yoga in treatment is going to be focused on gentle movements and stretches that support your body in the process of early recovery. Your teacher might use inspiring bits about how the practice of yoga relates to recovery- which it does in many ways. Many of the same spiritual themes you are learning about in your study of the twelve steps are represented in yoga- like surrender, trust, and humility. Your yoga practice will also help you learn how to breathe and focus on your breath. Yogic breath can be applied to your mindfulness and meditation practice, both also proven to be effective in reducing the troubling symptoms of early recovery.

 

Yoga is part of our regular program at Design For Change. Our innovative treatment programs can be customized to fit any length of need to help clients find the freedom and hope waiting for them in recovery. For more information on our transformational treatment programs changing lives one step at a time, call us today: (877) 267-3646