Tips for Settling Financial Wreckage of the Past

Tips for Settling Financial Wreckage of the Past

By DFCAdmin in Blogs | | 8 Sep 2017
 

It is common for people dealing with addiction to owe money. Some max out credit cards. Some get their cars repossessed. Others borrow money from acquaintances. They even rack up medical bills and legal fines. Whatever it is, it is not easy to face these consequences in sobriety. Nor is it simple to take care of the financial wreckage of the past after getting sober. Addicts may have spent their last dime or exhausted every resource due to their substance abuse. Trying to figure out how to rectify a financial situation can lead to large amounts of stress. Knowing where to start or how to accomplish paying any debt, can seem daunting. Embarrassment or entitlement can keep addicts from resolving their financial wreckage. A plan of action can be helpful to achieve financial security.

Have a positive perspective.

  • In 12-Step programs their moto is “one day at a time”. In this scenario, one bill at a time or one dollar at a time can help to simplify the fear of financial debt that the addict probably has. Without this philosophy, the addict could get overwhelmed by the amount of money they owe.

Research how much is owed.

  • When it comes to financial matters, people will dodge the inevitable. They do not want to know what they really owe or are unable to wrap their brain around the damage they caused. Sit down and figure out the final number. Knowledge of the amount will allow the addict some clarity.

Get a starting point.

  • The best recommendation to start paying down debt is to start with the smallest bill and pay what is feasible. If it is to a person, be honest about the amount that is being offered. If it is to a credit card company, call and let them know what the capabilities of paying down the deficit is. If it is to the IRS, just make the call. People in general are frightened of the IRS. The IRS only comes after people that are dodging them. Their agency will work with taxpayers if they are initially contacted to set up an installment plan.

Make payments.

  • Trust is a big deal in settling financial situations, especially with people. Keep the agreement. If for some reason payment cannot be tendered, be honest and let them know why and when the next payment will be received. Not only does this build reliance, but it will help the conscience of the addict.

 

Making amends is part of the recovery process. Design For Change encourages every cient to complete the 12 steps before graduating treatment. Offering the hope that exists in recovery, our treatment programs are changing lives one step at a time. Call us today for information: (877) 267-3646