Freedom in Recovery

Freedom in Recovery

By DFCAdmin in Addiction, recovery | | 3 Oct 2017
 

The addict will learn new habits in treatment.  The habits will provide building blocks to create a sober life.  Finding ways to cope with emotions, follow the 12 steps, and mend relationships are a few of the issues that will need attention post-treatment.  Freedom to decide what the new life will resemble is daunting.  The choices made depend on the individual’s personal life.  Reviewing options for housing, career, involvement in the community, and support give ideas for a successful life in recovery.

Freedom with housing and career decisions are limited to the area which the addict lives and the availability.  Resources can be found through therapists and support groups.  Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) groups are an outlet to the community.  Freedom from the chains of addiction can come from the continuous support of the 12-step program.

Sober living facilities are a great way to focus on recovery while building a new life.  Sober houses become a safe haven.  Groups of men or women live in a structured home until a permanent residence is found and the addict is comfortable enough to venture out.  The addict will have the freedom to pick housing and groups to be involved with.

The addict can create a list of experiences and skills to find the right career.  Speaking of the addict’s support network opens opportunities the person in recovery would not have seen otherwise.  The joy of building a new career motivates the individual to maintain sobriety and extend the engagement of a job.

Getting involved in the community is a positive outlet after treatment.  Building a new life includes volunteering, new hobbies, and becoming friends with other sober people.  Choosing the right volunteer work is based off what the individual enjoys.  The addict has the freedom to choose what will feel the most comfortable.  Whether the individual is involved in providing needs for others or enhancing the community environment, the result of fellowship and satisfaction will be uplifting.  AA groups and church organizations have wonderful opportunities to pay it forward.  Creating a new environment is vital for success in recovery.

The addict should never be fearful to ask for help.  Humbly requesting information from supporters shows the individual is continuously growing and striving to become better.  Support networks include doctors, therapists, AA groups, other 12 step programs, family, friends, and spiritual groups.  Other outlets to look for are exercise classes, educational classes, and group activities.

Building a new life can be scary.  Use Design for Change resources to better understand what the future holds and how our treatment will help you.  Decide to live a life free from the chains of addiction. (877) 267-3646